Twin Peaks Usenet Archive


Subject: Is Twin Peaks anti-woman? Are Twin Peaks fans?
From: larrabee@summit.ucsc.edu (Tracy Larrabee)
Date: 1990-11-11, 18:48
Newsgroups: alt.tv.twin-peaks
Reply-to: larrabee@summit.ucsc.edu.UUCP (Tracy Larrabee)

In article <1990Nov12.023048.23090@daffy.cs.wisc.edu> mlee@cat23.cs.wisc.edu (Michael Lee) writes:
> >In article  jym@remarque.berkeley.edu (Jym Dyer) writes:
>>> >>> 9.  Why was Donna acting slutty for a few episodes?
>> >>.-.
>> >>|C|ouldn't we find a better word than "slutty" here?  It has such
>> >>`-' negative connotations, and as it is rarely used to describe
>> >>    the actions of men, it comes across as pretty sexist.  (Nobody
>> >>    has called Ben Horne a "slut.")
> >
> >It was (I assume) intentionally negative.  Because she's toned down a little
> >it seems that it was just to make sure she didn't lose James, but I think
> >"slutty" is a fairly accurate description for her behavior in the jail.
> >

This disturbs me a lot.  I have heard that many feminists think Twin
Peaks is anti-woman, but I love the show so much that I was willing to
let all the iffy things pass.  But then there are comments like this.
Does this guy really believe that because Donna was acting like she
wanted to have sex that she is acting slutty?  And yet Ben Horne, a
married man who owns a brothel and tries out each new "girl" before
making her available to the customers, should not be refered to as a
slut?  He doesn't seem to understand the difference between a term
that condemns behavior in general and a term that condemns only
behavior in females.  Is this typical of Twin Peaks fans?  I thought
we were a mostly intellectual and aware lot, and then this dweeb comes
along ...

I find this so depressing.

Actually, I have told many people that Twin Peaks is reason enough to own
a television.  I have already found out that I don't like David Lynch
movies, but I love Twin Peaks.  I think the restrictions of network
censors keep Lynch from some of his most exploitive habits.


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